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Return of Sherlock Holmes, The

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<SPAN name="linkH2H_4_0013" id="H2H_4_0013"> <!-- H2 anchor --> </SPAN> </p> <div style="height: 4em;"> <br /><br /><br /><br /> </div> <h2> THE ADVENTURE OF THE SECOND STAIN </h2> <p> I had intended "The Adventure of the Abbey Grange" to be the last of those exploits of my friend, Mr. Sherlock Holmes, which I should ever communicate to the public. This resolution of mine was not due to any lack of material, since I have notes of many hundreds of cases to which I have never alluded, nor was it caused by any waning interest on the part of my readers in the singular personality and unique methods of this remarkable man. The real reason lay in the reluctance which Mr. Holmes has shown to the continued publication of his experiences. So long as he was in actual professional practice the records of his successes were of some practical value to him, but since he has definitely retired from London and betaken himself to study and bee-farming on the Sussex Downs, notoriety has become hateful to him, and he has peremptorily requested that his wishes in this matter should be strictly observed. It was only upon my representing to him that I had given a promise that "The Adventure of the Second Stain" should be published when the times were ripe, and pointing out to him that it is only appropriate that this long series of episodes should culminate in the most important international case which he has ever been called upon to handle, that I at last succeeded in obtaining his consent that a carefully guarded account of the incident should at last be laid before the public. If in telling the story I seem to be somewhat vague in certain details, the public will readily understand that there is an excellent reason for my reticence. </p> <p> It was, then, in a year, and even in a decade, that shall be nameless, that upon one Tuesday morning in autumn we found two visitors of European fame within the walls of our humble room in Baker Street. The one, austere, high-nosed, eagle-eyed, and dominant, was none other than the illustrious Lord Bellinger, twice Premier of Britain. The other, dark, clear-cut, and elegant, hardly yet of middle age, and endowed with every beauty of body and of mind, was the Right Honourable Trelawney Hope, Secretary for European Affairs, and the most rising statesman in the country. They sat side by side upon our paper-littered settee, and it was easy to see from their worn and anxious faces that it was business of the most pressing importance which had brought them. The Premier's thin, blue-veined hands were clasped tightly over the ivory head of his umbrella, and his gaunt, ascetic face looked gloomily from Holmes to me. The European Secretary pulled nervously at his moustache and fidgeted with the seals of his watch-chain. </p> <p> "When I discovered my loss, Mr. Holmes, which was at eight o'clock this morning, I at once informed the Prime Minister. It was at his suggestion that we have both come to you." </p> <p> "Have you informed the police?" </p> <p> "No, sir," said the Prime Minister, with the quick, decisive manner for which he was famous. "We have not done so, nor is it possible that we should do so. To inform the police must, in the long run, mean to inform the public. This is what we particularly desire to avoid." </p> <p> "And why, sir?" </p> <p> "Because the document in question is of such immense importance that its publication might very easily&mdash;I might almost say probably&mdash;lead to European complications of the utmost moment. It is not too much to say that peace or war may hang upon the issue. Unless its recovery can be attended with the utmost secrecy, then it may as well not be recovered at all, for all that is aimed at by those who have taken it is that its contents should be generally known." </p> <p> "I understand. Now, Mr. Trelawney Hope, I should be much obliged if you would tell me exactly the circumstances under which this document disappeared." </p> <p> "That can be done in a very few words, Mr. Holmes. The letter&mdash;for it was a letter from a foreign potentate&mdash;was received six days ago. It was of such importance that I have never left it in my safe, but have taken it across each evening to my house in Whitehall Terrace, and kept it in my bedroom in a locked despatch-box. It was there last night. Of that I am certain. I actually opened the box while I was dressing for dinner and saw the document inside. This morning it was gone. The despatch-box had stood beside the glass upon my dressing-table all night. I am a light sleeper, and so is my wife. We are both prepared to swear that no one could have entered the room during the night. And yet I repeat that the paper is gone." </p> <p> "What time did you dine?" </p> <p> "Half-past seven." </p> <p> "How long was it before you went to bed?" </p> <p> "My wife had gone to the theatre. I waited up for her. It was half-past eleven before we went to our room." </p> <p> "Then for four hours the despatch-box had lain unguarded?" </p> <p> "No one is ever permitted to enter that room save the house-maid in the morning, and my valet, or my wife's maid, during the rest of the day. They are both trusty servants who have been with us for some time. Besides, neither of them could possibly have known that there was anything more valuable than the ordinary departmental papers in my despatch-box." </p> <p> "Who did know of the existence of that letter?" </p> <p> "No one in the house." </p> <p> "Surely your wife knew?" </p> <p> "No, sir. I had said nothing to my wife until I missed the paper this morning." </p> <p> The Premier nodded approvingly. </p> <p> "I have long known, sir, how high is your sense of public duty," said he. "I am convinced that in the case of a secret of this importance it would rise superior to the most intimate domestic ties." </p> <p> The European Secretary bowed. </p> <p> "You do me no more than justice, sir. Until this morning I have never breathed one word to my wife upon this matter." </p> <p> "Could she have guessed?" </p> <p> "No, Mr. Holmes, she could not have guessed&mdash;nor could anyone have guessed." </p> <p> "Have you lost any documents before?" </p> <p> "No, sir." </p> <p> "Who is there in England who did know of the existence of this letter?" </p> <p> "Each member of the Cabinet was informed of it yesterday, but the pledge of secrecy which attends every Cabinet meeting was increased by the solemn warning which was given by the Prime Minister. Good heavens, to think that within a few hours I should myself have lost it!" His handsome face was distorted with a spasm of despair, and his hands tore at his hair. For a moment we caught a glimpse of the natural man, impulsive, ardent, keenly sensitive. The next the aristocratic mask was replaced, and the gentle voice had returned. "Besides the members of the Cabinet there are two, or possibly three, departmental officials who know of the letter. No one else in England, Mr. Holmes, I assure you." </p> <p> "But abroad?" </p> <p> "I believe that no one abroad has seen it save the man who wrote it. I am well convinced that his Ministers&mdash;that the usual official channels have not been employed." </p> <p> Holmes considered for some little time. </p> <p> "Now, sir, I must ask you more particularly what this document is, and why its disappearance should have such momentous consequences?" </p> <p> The two statesmen exchanged a quick glance and the Premier's shaggy eyebrows gathered in a frown. </p> <p> "Mr. Holmes, the envelope is a long, thin one of pale blue colour. There is a seal of red wax stamped with a crouching lion. It is addressed in large, bold handwriting to&mdash;&mdash;" </p> <p> "I fear, sir," said Holmes, "that, interesting and indeed essential as these details are, my inquiries must go more to the root of things. What WAS the letter?" </p> <p> "That is a State secret of the utmost importance, and I fear that I cannot tell you, nor do I see that it is necessary. If by the aid of the powers which you are said to possess you can find such an envelope as I describe with its enclosure, you will have deserved well of your country, and earned any reward which it lies in our power to bestow." </p> <p> Sherlock Holmes rose with a smile. </p> <p> "You are two of the most busy men in the country," said he, "and in my own small way I have also a good many calls upon me. I regret exceedingly that I cannot help you in this matter, and any continuation of this interview would be a waste of time." </p> <p> The Premier sprang to his feet with that quick, fierce gleam of his deep-set eyes before which a Cabinet has cowered. "I am not accustomed, sir," he began, but mastered his anger and resumed his seat. For a minute or more we all sat in silence. Then the old statesman shrugged his shoulders. </p> <p> "We must accept your terms, Mr. Holmes. No doubt you are right, and it is unreasonable for us to expect you to act unless we give you our entire confidence." </p> <p> "I agree with you," said the younger statesman. </p> <p> "Then I will tell you, relying entirely upon your honour and that of your colleague, Dr. Watson. I may appeal to your patriotism also, for I could not imagine a greater misfortune for the country than that this affair should come out." </p> <p> "You may safely trust us." </p> <p> "The letter, then, is from a certain foreign potentate who has been ruffled by some recent Colonial developments of this country. It has been written hurriedly and upon his own responsibility entirely. Inquiries have shown that his Ministers know nothing of the matter. At the same time it is couched in so unfortunate a manner, and certain phrases in it are of so provocative a character, that its publication would undoubtedly lead to a most dangerous state of feeling in this country. There would be such a ferment, sir, that I do not hesitate to say that within a week of the publication of that letter this country would be involved in a great war." </p> <p> Holmes wrote a name upon a slip of paper and handed it to the Premier. </p> <p> "Exactly. It was he. And it is this letter&mdash;this letter which may well mean the expenditure of a thousand millions and the lives of a hundred thousand men&mdash;which has become lost in this unaccountable fashion." </p> <p> "Have you informed the sender?" </p> <p> "Yes, sir, a cipher telegram has been despatched." </p> <p> "Perhaps he desires the publication of the letter." </p> <p> "No, sir, we have strong reason to believe that he already understands that he has acted in an indiscreet and hot-headed manner. It would be a greater blow to him and to his country than to us if this letter were to come out." </p> <p> "If this is so, whose interest is it that the letter should come out? Why should anyone desire to steal it or to publish it?" </p> <p> "There, Mr. Holmes, you take me into regions of high international politics. But if you consider the European situation you will have no difficulty in perceiving the motive. The whole of Europe is an armed camp. There is a double league which makes a fair balance of military power. Great Britain holds the scales. If Britain were driven into war with one confederacy, it would assure the supremacy of the other confederacy, whether they joined in the war or not. Do you follow?" </p> <p> "Very clearly. It is then the interest of the enemies of this potentate to secure and publish this letter, so as to make a breach between his country and ours?" </p> <p> "Yes, sir." </p> <p> "And to whom would this document be sent if it fell into the hands of an enemy?" </p> <p> "To any of the great Chancelleries of Europe. It is probably speeding on its way thither at the present instant as fast as steam can take it." </p> <p> Mr. Trelawney Hope dropped his head on his chest and groaned aloud. The Premier placed his hand kindly upon his shoulder. </p> <p> "It is your misfortune, my dear fellow. No one can blame you. There is no precaution which you have neglected. Now, Mr. Holmes, you are in full possession of the facts. What course do you recommend?" </p> <p> Holmes shook his head mournfully. </p> <p> "You think, sir, that unless this document is recovered there will be war?" </p> <p> "I think it is very probable." </p> <p> "Then, sir, prepare for war." </p> <p> "That is a hard saying, Mr. Holmes." </p> <p> "Consider the facts, sir. It is inconceivable that it was taken after eleven-thirty at night, since I understand that Mr. Hope and his wife were both in the room from that hour until the loss was found out. It was taken, then, yesterday evening between seven-thirty and eleven-thirty, probably near the earlier hour, since whoever took it evidently knew that it was there and would naturally secure it as early as possible. Now, sir, if a document of this importance were taken at that hour, where can it be now? No one has any reason to retain it. It has been passed rapidly on to those who need it. What chance have we now to overtake or even to trace it? It is beyond our reach." </p> <p> The Prime Minister rose from the settee. </p> <p> "What you say is perfectly logical, Mr. Holmes. I feel that the matter is indeed out of our hands." </p> <p> "Let us presume, for argument's sake, that the document was taken by the maid or by the valet&mdash;&mdash;" </p> <p> "They are both old and tried servants." </p> <p> "I understand you to say that your room is on the second floor, that there is no entrance from without, and that from within no one could go up unobserved. It must, then, be somebody in the house who has taken it. To whom would the thief take it? To one of several international spies and secret agents, whose names are tolerably familiar to me. There are three who may be said to be the heads of their profession. I will begin my research by going round and finding if each of them is at his post. If one is missing&mdash;especially if he has disappeared since last night&mdash;we will have some indication as to where the document has gone." </p> <p> "Why should he be missing?" asked the European Secretary. "He would take the letter to an Embassy in London, as likely as not." </p> <p> "I fancy not. These agents work independently, and their relations with the Embassies are often strained." </p> <p> The Prime Minister nodded his acquiescence. </p> <p> "I believe you are right, Mr. Holmes. He would take so valuable a prize to headquarters with his own hands. I think that your course of action is an excellent one. Meanwhile, Hope, we cannot neglect all our other duties on account of this one misfortune. Should there be any fresh developments during the day we shall communicate with you, and you will no doubt let us know the results of your own inquiries." </p> <p> The two statesmen bowed and walked gravely from the room. </p> <p> When our illustrious visitors had departed Holmes lit his pipe in silence and sat for some time lost in the deepest thought. I had opened the morning paper and was immersed in a sensational crime which had occurred in London the night before, when my friend gave an exclamation, sprang to his feet, and laid his pipe down upon the mantelpiece. </p> <p> "Yes," said he, "there is no better way of approaching it. The situation is desperate, but not hopeless. Even now, if we could be sure which of them has taken it, it is just possible that it has not yet passed out of his hands. After all, it is a question of money with these fellows, and I have the British treasury behind me. If it's on the market I'll buy it&mdash;if it means another penny on the income-tax. It is conceivable that the fellow might hold it back to see what bids come from this side before he tries his luck on the other. There are only those three capable of playing so bold a game&mdash;there are Oberstein, La Rothiere, and Eduardo Lucas. I will see each of them." </p> <p> I glanced at my morning paper. </p> <p> "Is that Eduardo Lucas of Godolphin Street?" </p> <p> "Yes." </p> <p> "You will not see him." </p> <p> "Why not?" </p> <p> "He was murdered in his house last night." </p> <p> My friend has so often astonished me in the course of our adventures that it was with a sense of exultation that I realized how completely I had astonished him. He stared in amazement, and then snatched the paper from my hands. This was the paragraph which I had been engaged in reading when he rose from his chair. </p> <p> MURDER IN WESTMINSTER </p> <p> A crime of mysterious character was committed last night at 16 Godolphin Street, one of the old-fashioned and secluded rows of eighteenth century houses which lie between the river and the Abbey, almost in the shadow of the great Tower of the Houses of Parliament. This small but select mansion has been inhabited for some years by Mr. Eduardo Lucas, well known in society circles both on account of his charming personality and because he has the well-deserved reputation of being one of the best amateur tenors in the country. Mr. Lucas is an unmarried man, thirty-four years of age, and his establishment consists of Mrs. Pringle, an elderly housekeeper, and of Mitton, his valet. The former retires early and sleeps at the top of the house. The valet was out for the evening, visiting a friend at Hammersmith. From ten o'clock onward Mr. Lucas had the house to himself. What occurred during that time has not yet transpired, but at a quarter to twelve Police-constable Barrett, passing along Godolphin Street observed that the door of No. 16 was ajar. He knocked, but received no answer. Perceiving a light in the front room, he advanced into the passage and again knocked, but without reply. He then pushed open the door and entered. The room was in a state of wild disorder, the furniture being all swept to one side, and one chair lying on its back in the centre. Beside this chair, and still grasping one of its legs, lay the unfortunate tenant of the house. He had been stabbed to the heart and must have died instantly. The knife with which the crime had been committed was a curved Indian dagger, plucked down from a trophy of Oriental arms which adorned one of the walls. Robbery does not appear to have been the motive of the crime, for there had been no attempt to remove the valuable contents of the room. Mr. Eduardo Lucas was so well known and popular that his violent and mysterious fate will arouse painful interest and intense sympathy in a widespread circle of friends. </p> <p> "Well, Watson, what do you make of this?" asked Holmes, after a long pause. </p> <p> "It is an amazing coincidence." </p> <p> "A coincidence! Here is one of the three men whom we had named as possible actors in this drama, and he meets a violent death during the very hours when we know that that drama was being enacted. The odds are enormous against its being coincidence. No figures could express them. No, my dear Watson, the two events are connected&mdash;MUST be connected. It is for us to find the connection." </p> <p> "But now the official police must know all." </p> <p> "Not at all. They know all they see at Godolphin Street. They know&mdash;and shall know&mdash;nothing of Whitehall Terrace. Only WE know of both events, and can trace the relation between them. There is one obvious point which would, in any case, have turned my suspicions against Lucas. Godolphin Street, Westminster, is only a few minutes' walk from Whitehall Terrace. The other secret agents whom I have named live in the extreme West End. It was easier, therefore, for Lucas than for the others to establish a connection or receive a message from the European Secretary's household&mdash;a small thing, and yet where events are compressed into a few hours it may prove essential. Halloa! what have we here?" </p> <p> Mrs. Hudson had appeared with a lady's card upon her salver. Holmes glanced at it, raised his eyebrows, and handed it over to me. </p> <p> "Ask Lady Hilda Trelawney Hope if she will be kind enough to step up," said he. </p> <p> A moment later our modest apartment, already so distinguished that morning, was further honoured by the entrance of the most lovely woman in London. I had often heard of the beauty of the youngest daughter of the Duke of Belminster, but no description of it, and no contemplation of colourless photographs, had prepared me for the subtle, delicate charm and the beautiful colouring of that exquisite head. And yet as we saw it that autumn morning, it was not its beauty which would be the first thing to impress the observer. The cheek was lovely but it was paled with emotion, the eyes were bright but it was the brightness of fever, the sensitive mouth was tight and drawn in an effort after self-command. Terror&mdash;not beauty&mdash;was what sprang first to the eye as our fair visitor stood framed for an instant in the open door. </p> <p> "Has my husband been here, Mr. Holmes?" </p> <p> "Yes, madam, he has been here." </p> <p> "Mr. Holmes. I implore you not to tell him that I came here." Holmes bowed coldly, and motioned the lady to a chair. </p> <p> "Your ladyship places me in a very delicate position. I beg that you will sit down and tell me what you desire, but I fear that I cannot make any unconditional promise." </p> <p> She swept across the room and seated herself with her back to the window. It was a queenly presence&mdash;tall, graceful, and intensely womanly. "Mr. Holmes," she said&mdash;and her white-gloved hands clasped and unclasped as she spoke&mdash;"I will speak frankly to you in the hopes that it may induce you to speak frankly in return. There is complete confidence between my husband and me on all matters save one. That one is politics. On this his lips are sealed. He tells me nothing. Now, I am aware that there was a most deplorable occurrence in our house last night. I know that a paper has disappeared. But because the matter is political my husband refuses to take me into his complete confidence. Now it is essential&mdash;essential, I say&mdash;that I should thoroughly understand it. You are the only other person, save only these politicians, who knows the true facts. I beg you then, Mr. Holmes, to tell me exactly what has happened and what it will lead to. Tell me all, Mr. Holmes. Let no regard for your client's interests keep you silent, for I assure you that his interests, if he would only see it, would be best served by taking me into his complete confidence. What was this paper which was stolen?" </p> <p> "Madam, what you ask me is really impossible." </p> <p> She groaned and sank her face in her hands. </p> <p> "You must see that this is so, madam. If your husband thinks fit to keep you in the dark over this matter, is it for me, who has only learned the true facts under the pledge of professional secrecy, to tell what he has withheld? It is not fair to ask it. It is him whom you must ask." </p> <p> "I have asked him. I come to you as a last resource. But without your telling me anything definite, Mr. Holmes, you may do a great service if you would enlighten me on one point." </p> <p> "What is it, madam?" </p> <p> "Is my husband's political career likely to suffer through this incident?" </p> <p> "Well, madam, unless it is set right it may certainly have a very unfortunate effect." </p> <p> "Ah!" She drew in her breath sharply as one whose doubts are resolved. </p> <p> "One more question, Mr. Holmes. From an expression which my husband dropped in the first shock of this disaster I understood that terrible public consequences might arise from the loss of this document." </p> <p> "If he said so, I certainly cannot deny it." </p> <p> "Of what nature are they?" </p> <p> "Nay, madam, there again you ask me more than I can possibly answer." </p> <p> "Then I will take up no more of your time. I cannot blame you, Mr. Holmes, for having refused to speak more freely, and you on your side will not, I am sure, think the worse of me because I desire, even against his will, to share my husband's anxieties. Once more I beg that you will say nothing of my visit." </p> <p> She looked back at us from the door, and I had a last impression of that beautiful haunted face, the startled eyes, and the drawn mouth. Then she was gone. </p> <p> "Now, Watson, the fair sex is your department," said Holmes, with a smile, when the dwindling frou-frou of skirts had ended in the slam of the front door. "What was the fair lady's game? What did she really want?" </p> <p> "Surely her own statement is clear and her anxiety very natural." </p> <p> "Hum! Think of her appearance, Watson&mdash;her manner, her suppressed excitement, her restlessness, her tenacity in asking questions. Remember that she comes of a caste who do not lightly show emotion." </p> <p> "She was certainly much moved." </p> <p> "Remember also the curious earnestness with which she assured us that it was best for her husband that she should know all. What did she mean by that? And you must have observed, Watson, how she manoeuvred to have the light at her back. She did not wish us to read her expression." </p> <p> "Yes, she chose the one chair in the room." </p> <p> "And yet the motives of women are so inscrutable. You remember the woman at Margate whom I suspected for the same reason. No powder on her nose&mdash;that proved to be the correct solution. How can you build on such a quicksand? Their most trivial action may mean volumes, or their most extraordinary conduct may depend upon a hairpin or a curling tongs. Good-morning, Watson." </p> <p> "You are off?" </p> <p> "Yes, I will while away the morning at Godolphin Street with our friends of the regular establishment. With Eduardo Lucas lies the solution of our problem, though I must admit that I have not an inkling as to what form it may take. It is a capital mistake to theorize in advance of the facts. Do you stay on guard, my good Watson, and receive any fresh visitors. I'll join you at lunch if I am able." </p> <p>
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