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Kim

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<SPAN NAME="chap09"></SPAN> <H3 ALIGN="center"> Chapter 9 </H3> <BR> <P CLASS="poem"> S' doaks was son of Yelth the wise&mdash;<BR> Chief of the Raven clan.<BR> Itswoot the Bear had him in care<BR> To make him a medicine-man.<BR> <BR> He was quick and quicker to learn&mdash;<BR> Bold and bolder to dare:<BR> He danced the dread Kloo-Kwallie Dance<BR> To tickle Itswoot the Bear!<BR> <BR> Oregon Legend<BR> </P> <BR> <P> Kim flung himself whole-heartedly upon the next turn of the wheel. He would be a Sahib again for a while. In that idea, so soon as he had reached the broad road under Simla Town Hall, he cast about for one to impress. A Hindu child, some ten years old, squatted under a lamp-post. </P> <P> 'Where is Mr Lurgan's house?' demanded Kim. </P> <P> 'I do not understand English,' was the answer, and Kim shifted his speech accordingly. </P> <P> 'I will show.' </P> <P> Together they set off through the mysterious dusk, full of the noises of a city below the hillside, and the breath of a cool wind in deodar-crowned Jakko, shouldering the stars. The house-lights, scattered on every level, made, as it were, a double firmament. Some were fixed, others belonged to the 'rickshaws of the careless, open-spoken English folk, going out to dinner. </P> <P> 'It is here,' said Kim's guide, and halted in a veranda flush with the main road. No door stayed them, but a curtain of beaded reeds that split up the lamplight beyond. </P> <P> 'He is come,' said the boy, in a voice little louder than a sigh, and vanished. Kim felt sure that the boy had been posted to guide him from the first, but, putting a bold face on it, parted the curtain. A black-bearded man, with a green shade over his eyes, sat at a table, and, one by one, with short, white hands, picked up globules of light from a tray before him, threaded them on a glancing silken string, and hummed to himself the while. Kim was conscious that beyond the circle of light the room was full of things that smelt like all the temples of all the East. A whiff of musk, a puff of sandal-wood, and a breath of sickly jessamine-oil caught his opened nostrils. </P> <P> 'I am here,' said Kim at last, speaking in the vernacular: the smells made him forget that he was to be a Sahib. </P> <P> 'Seventy-nine, eighty, eighty-one,' the man counted to himself, stringing pearl after pearl so quickly that Kim could scarcely follow his fingers. He slid off the green shade and looked fixedly at Kim for a full half-minute. The pupils of the eye dilated and closed to pin-pricks, as if at will. There was a fakir by the Taksali Gate who had just this gift and made money by it, especially when cursing silly women. Kim stared with interest. His disreputable friend could further twitch his ears, almost like a goat, and Kim was disappointed that this new man could not imitate him. </P> <P> 'Do not be afraid,' said Lurgan Sahib suddenly. </P> <P> 'Why should I fear?' </P> <P> 'Thou wilt sleep here tonight, and stay with me till it is time to go again to Nucklao. It is an order.' </P> <P> 'It is an order,' Kim repeated. 'But where shall I sleep?' </P> <P> 'Here, in this room.' Lurgan Sahib waved his hand towards the darkness behind him. </P> <P> 'So be it,' said Kim composedly. 'Now?' </P> <P> He nodded and held the lamp above his head. As the light swept them, there leaped out from the walls a collection of Tibetan devil-dance masks, hanging above the fiend-embroidered draperies of those ghastly functions&mdash;horned masks, scowling masks, and masks of idiotic terror. In a corner, a Japanese warrior, mailed and plumed, menaced him with a halberd, and a score of lances and khandas and kuttars gave back the unsteady gleam. But what interested Kim more than all these things&mdash;he had seen devil-dance masks at the Lahore Museum&mdash;was a glimpse of the soft-eyed Hindu child who had left him in the doorway, sitting cross-legged under the table of pearls with a little smile on his scarlet lips. </P> <P> 'I think that Lurgan Sahib wishes to make me afraid. And I am sure that that devil's brat below the table wishes to see me afraid. </P> <P> 'This place,' he said aloud, 'is like a Wonder House. Where is my bed?' </P> <P> Lurgan Sahib pointed to a native quilt in a corner by the loathsome masks, picked up the lamp, and left the room black. </P> <P> 'Was that Lurgan Sahib?' Kim asked as he cuddled down. No answer. He could hear the Hindu boy breathing, however, and, guided by the sound, crawled across the floor, and cuffed into the darkness, crying: 'Give answer, devil! Is this the way to lie to a Sahib?' </P> <P> From the darkness he fancied he could hear the echo of a chuckle. It could not be his soft-fleshed companion, because he was weeping. So Kim lifted up his voice and called aloud: </P> <P> 'Lurgan Sahib! O Lurgan Sahib! Is it an order that thy servant does not speak to me?' </P> <P> 'It is an order.' The voice came from behind him and he started. </P> <P> 'Very good. But remember,' he muttered, as he resought the quilt, 'I will beat thee in the morning. I do not love Hindus.' </P> <P> That was no cheerful night; the room being overfull of voices and music. Kim was waked twice by someone calling his name. The second time he set out in search, and ended by bruising his nose against a box that certainly spoke with a human tongue, but in no sort of human accent. It seemed to end in a tin trumpet and to be joined by wires to a smaller box on the floor&mdash;so far, at least, as he could judge by touch. And the voice, very hard and whirring, came out of the trumpet. Kim rubbed his nose and grew furious, thinking, as usual, in Hindi. </P> <P> 'This with a beggar from the bazar might be good, but&mdash;I am a Sahib and the son of a Sahib and, which is twice as much more beside, a student of Nucklao. Yess' (here he turned to English), 'a boy of St Xavier's. Damn Mr Lurgan's eyes!&mdash;It is some sort of machinery like a sewing-machine. Oh, it is a great cheek of him&mdash;we are not frightened that way at Lucknow&mdash;No!' Then in Hindi: 'But what does he gain? He is only a trader&mdash;I am in his shop. But Creighton Sahib is a Colonel&mdash;and I think Creighton Sahib gave orders that it should be done. How I will beat that Hindu in the morning! What is this?' </P> <P> The trumpet-box was pouring out a string of the most elaborate abuse that even Kim had ever heard, in a high uninterested voice, that for a moment lifted the short hairs of his neck. When the vile thing drew breath, Kim was reassured by the soft, sewing-machine-like whirr. </P> <P> 'Chup! [Be still]' he cried, and again he heard a chuckle that decided him. 'Chup&mdash;or I break your head.' </P> <P> The box took no heed. Kim wrenched at the tin trumpet and something lifted with a click. He had evidently raised a lid. If there were a devil inside, now was its time, for&mdash;he sniffed&mdash;thus did the sewing-machines of the bazar smell. He would clean that shaitan. He slipped off his jacket, and plunged it into the box's mouth. Something long and round bent under the pressure, there was a whirr and the voice stopped&mdash;as voices must if you ram a thrice-doubled coat on to the wax cylinder and into the works of an expensive phonograph. Kim finished his slumbers with a serene mind. </P> <P> In the morning he was aware of Lurgan Sahib looking down on him. </P> <P> 'Oah!' said Kim, firmly resolved to cling to his Sahib-dom. 'There was a box in the night that gave me bad talk. So I stopped it. Was it your box?' </P> <P> The man held out his hand. </P> <P> 'Shake hands, O'Hara,' he said. 'Yes, it was my box. I keep such things because my friends the Rajahs like them. That one is broken, but it was cheap at the price. Yes, my friends, the Kings, are very fond of toys&mdash;and so am I sometimes.' </P> <P> Kim looked him over out of the corners of his eyes. He was a Sahib in that he wore Sahib's clothes; the accent of his Urdu, the intonation of his English, showed that he was anything but a Sahib. He seemed to understand what moved in Kim's mind ere the boy opened his mouth, and he took no pains to explain himself as did Father Victor or the Lucknow masters. Sweetest of all&mdash;he treated Kim as an equal on the Asiatic side. </P> <P> 'I am sorry you cannot beat my boy this morning. He says he will kill you with a knife or poison. He is jealous, so I have put him in the corner and I shall not speak to him today. He has just tried to kill me. You must help me with the breakfast. He is almost too jealous to trust, just now.' </P> <P> Now a genuine imported Sahib from England would have made a great to-do over this tale. Lurgan Sahib stated it as simply as Mahbub Ali was used to record his little affairs in the North. </P> <P> The back veranda of the shop was built out over the sheer hillside, and they looked down into their neighbours' chimney-pots, as is the custom of Simla. But even more than the purely Persian meal cooked by Lurgan Sahib with his own hands, the shop fascinated Kim. The Lahore Museum was larger, but here were more wonders&mdash;ghost-daggers and prayer-wheels from Tibet; turquoise and raw amber necklaces; green jade bangles; curiously packed incense-sticks in jars crusted over with raw garnets; the devil-masks of overnight and a wall full of peacock-blue draperies; gilt figures of Buddha, and little portable lacquer altars; Russian samovars with turquoises on the lid; egg-shell china sets in quaint octagonal cane boxes; yellow ivory crucifixes&mdash;from Japan of all places in the world, so Lurgan Sahib said; carpets in dusty bales, smelling atrociously, pushed back behind torn and rotten screens of geometrical work; Persian water-jugs for the hands after meals; dull copper incense-burners neither Chinese nor Persian, with friezes of fantastic devils running round them; tarnished silver belts that knotted like raw hide; hairpins of jade, ivory, and plasma; arms of all sorts and kinds, and a thousand other oddments were cased, or piled, or merely thrown into the room, leaving a clear space only round the rickety deal table, where Lurgan Sahib worked. </P> <P> 'Those things are nothing,' said his host, following Kim's glance. 'I buy them because they are pretty, and sometimes I sell&mdash;if I like the buyer's look. My work is on the table&mdash;some of it.' </P> <P> It blazed in the morning light&mdash;all red and blue and green flashes, picked out with the vicious blue-white spurt of a diamond here and there. Kim opened his eyes. </P> <P> 'Oh, they are quite well, those stones. It will not hurt them to take the sun. Besides, they are cheap. But with sick stones it is very different.' He piled Kim's plate anew. 'There is no one but me can doctor a sick pearl and re-blue turquoises. I grant you opals&mdash;any fool can cure an opal&mdash;but for a sick pearl there is only me. Suppose I were to die! Then there would be no one ... Oh no! You cannot do anything with jewels. It will be quite enough if you understand a little about the Turquoise&mdash;some day.' </P> <P> He moved to the end of the veranda to refill the heavy, porous clay water-jug from the filter. </P> <P> 'Do you want drink?' </P> <P> Kim nodded. Lurgan Sahib, fifteen feet off, laid one hand on the jar. Next instant, it stood at Kim's elbow, full to within half an inch of the brim&mdash;the white cloth only showing, by a small wrinkle, where it had slid into place. </P> <P> 'Wah!' said Kim in most utter amazement. 'That is magic.' Lurgan Sahib's smile showed that the compliment had gone home. </P> <P> 'Throw it back.' </P> <P> 'It will break.' </P> <P> 'I say, throw it back.' </P> <P> Kim pitched it at random. It fell short and crashed into fifty pieces, while the water dripped through the rough veranda boarding. </P> <P> 'I said it would break.' </P> <P> 'All one. Look at it. Look at the largest piece.' </P> <P> That lay with a sparkle of water in its curve, as it were a star on the floor. Kim looked intently. Lurgan Sahib laid one hand gently on the nape of his neck, stroked it twice or thrice, and whispered: 'Look! It shall come to life again, piece by piece. First the big piece shall join itself to two others on the right and the left&mdash;on the right and the left. Look!' </P> <P> To save his life, Kim could not have turned his head. The light touch held him as in a vice, and his blood tingled pleasantly through him. There was one large piece of the jar where there had been three, and above them the shadowy outline of the entire vessel. He could see the veranda through it, but it was thickening and darkening with each beat of his pulse. Yet the jar&mdash;how slowly the thoughts came!&mdash;the jar had been smashed before his eyes. Another wave of prickling fire raced down his neck, as Lurgan Sahib moved his hand. </P> <P> 'Look! It is coming into shape,' said Lurgan Sahib. </P> <P> So far Kim had been thinking in Hindi, but a tremor came on him, and with an effort like that of a swimmer before sharks, who hurls himself half out of the water, his mind leaped up from a darkness that was swallowing it and took refuge in&mdash;the multiplication-table in English! </P> <P> 'Look! It is coming into shape,' whispered Lurgan Sahib. </P> <P> The jar had been smashed&mdash;yess, smashed&mdash;not the native word, he would not think of that&mdash;but smashed&mdash;into fifty pieces, and twice three was six, and thrice three was nine, and four times three was twelve. He clung desperately to the repetition. The shadow-outline of the jar cleared like a mist after rubbing eyes. There were the broken shards; there was the spilt water drying in the sun, and through the cracks of the veranda showed, all ribbed, the white house-wall below&mdash;and thrice twelve was thirty-six! </P> <P> 'Look! Is it coming into shape?' asked Lurgan Sahib. </P> <P> 'But it is smashed&mdash;smashed,' he gasped&mdash;Lurgan Sahib had been muttering softly for the last half-minute. Kim wrenched his head aside. 'Look! Dekho! It is there as it was there.' </P> <P> 'It is there as it was there,' said Lurgan, watching Kim closely while the boy rubbed his neck. 'But you are the first of many who has ever seen it so.' He wiped his broad forehead. </P> <P> 'Was that more magic?' Kim asked suspiciously. The tingle had gone from his veins; he felt unusually wide awake. </P> <P> 'No, that was not magic. It was only to see if there was&mdash;a flaw in a jewel. Sometimes very fine jewels will fly all to pieces if a man holds them in his hand, and knows the proper way. That is why one must be careful before one sets them. Tell me, did you see the shape of the pot?' </P> <P> 'For a little time. It began to grow like a flower from the ground.' </P> <P> 'And then what did you do? I mean, how did you think?' </P> <P> 'Oah! I knew it was broken, and so, I think, that was what I thought&mdash;and it was broken.' </P> <P> 'Hm! Has anyone ever done that same sort of magic to you before?' </P> <P> 'If it was,' said Kim 'do you think I should let it again? I should run away.' </P> <P> 'And now you are not afraid&mdash;eh?' </P> <P> 'Not now.' </P> <P> Lurgan Sahib looked at him more closely than ever. 'I shall ask Mahbub Ali&mdash;not now, but some day later,' he muttered. 'I am pleased with you&mdash;yes; and I am pleased with you&mdash;no. You are the first that ever saved himself. I wish I knew what it was that ... But you are right. You should not tell that&mdash;not even to me.' </P> <P> He turned into the dusky gloom of the shop, and sat down at the table, rubbing his hands softly. A small, husky sob came from behind a pile of carpets. It was the Hindu child obediently facing towards the wall. His thin shoulders worked with grief. </P> <P> 'Ah! He is jealous, so jealous. I wonder if he will try to poison me again in my breakfast, and make me cook it twice. </P> <P> 'Kubbee&mdash;kubbee nahin [Never&mdash;never. No!]', came the broken answer. </P> <P> 'And whether he will kill this other boy?' </P> <BR> <P> 'Kubbee&mdash;kubbee nahin.' </P> <P> 'What do you think he will do?' He turned suddenly on Kim. </P> <P> 'Oah! I do not know. Let him go, perhaps. Why did he want to poison you?' </P> <P> 'Because he is so fond of me. Suppose you were fond of someone, and you saw someone come, and the man you were fond of was more pleased with him than he was with you, what would you do?' </P> <P> Kim thought. Lurgan repeated the sentence slowly in the vernacular. 'I should not poison that man,' said Kim reflectively, 'but I should beat that boy&mdash;if that boy was fond of my man. But first, I would ask that boy if it were true.' </P> <P> 'Ah! He thinks everyone must be fond of me.' </P> <P> 'Then I think he is a fool.' </P> <P> 'Hearest thou?' said Lurgan Sahib to the shaking shoulders. 'The Sahib's son thinks thou art a little fool. Come out, and next time thy heart is troubled, do not try white arsenic quite so openly. Surely the Devil Dasim was lord of our table-cloth that day! It might have made me ill, child, and then a stranger would have guarded the jewels. Come!' </P> <P> The child, heavy-eyed with much weeping, crept out from behind the bale and flung himself passionately at Lurgan Sahib's feet, with an extravagance of remorse that impressed even Kim. </P> <P> 'I will look into the ink-pools&mdash;I will faithfully guard the jewels! Oh, my Father and my Mother, send him away!' He indicated Kim with a backward jerk of his bare heel. </P> <P> 'Not yet&mdash;not yet. In a little while he will go away again. But now he is at school&mdash;at a new madrissah&mdash;and thou shalt be his teacher. Play the Play of the Jewels against him. I will keep tally.' </P> <P> The child dried his tears at once, and dashed to the back of the shop, whence he returned with a copper tray. </P> <P> 'Give me!' he said to Lurgan Sahib. 'Let them come from thy hand, for he may say that I knew them before.' </P> <P> 'Gently&mdash;gently,' the man replied, and from a drawer under the table dealt a half-handful of clattering trifles into the tray. </P> <P> 'Now,' said the child, waving an old newspaper. 'Look on them as long as thou wilt, stranger. Count and, if need be, handle. One look is enough for me.' He turned his back proudly. </P> <P> 'But what is the game?' </P> <P> 'When thou hast counted and handled and art sure that thou canst remember them all, I cover them with this paper, and thou must tell over the tally to Lurgan Sahib. I will write mine.' </P> <P> 'Oah!' The instinct of competition waked in his breast. He bent over the tray. There were but fifteen stones on it. 'That is easy,' he said after a minute. The child slipped the paper over the winking jewels and scribbled in a native account-book. </P> <P> 'There are under that paper five blue stones&mdash;one big, one smaller, and three small,' said Kim, all in haste. 'There are four green stones, and one with a hole in it; there is one yellow stone that I can see through, and one like a pipe-stem. There are two red stones, and&mdash;and&mdash;I made the count fifteen, but two I have forgotten. No! Give me time. One was of ivory, little and brownish; and&mdash;and&mdash;give me time...' </P> <P> 'One&mdash;two'&mdash;Lurgan Sahib counted him out up to ten. Kim shook his head. </P> <P> 'Hear my count!' the child burst in, trilling with laughter. 'First, are two flawed sapphires&mdash;one of two ruttees and one of four as I should judge. The four-ruttee sapphire is chipped at the edge. There is one Turkestan turquoise, plain with black veins, and there are two inscribed&mdash;one with a Name of God in gilt, and the other being cracked across, for it came out of an old ring, I cannot read. We have now all five blue stones. Four flawed emeralds there are, but one is drilled in two places, and one is a little carven-' </P> <P> 'Their weights?' said Lurgan Sahib impassively. </P> <P> 'Three&mdash;five&mdash;five&mdash;and four ruttees as I judge it. There is one piece of old greenish pipe amber, and a cut topaz from Europe. There is one ruby of Burma, of two ruttees, without a flaw, and there is a balas-ruby, flawed, of two ruttees. There is a carved ivory from China representing a rat sucking an egg; and there is last&mdash;ah ha!&mdash;a ball of crystal as big as a bean set on a gold leaf.' </P> <P> He clapped his hands at the close. </P> <P> 'He is thy master,' said Lurgan Sahib, smiling. </P> <P> 'Huh! He knew the names of the stones,' said Kim, flushing. 'Try again! With common things such as he and I both know.' </P> <P> They heaped the tray again with odds and ends gathered from the shop, and even the kitchen, and every time the child won, till Kim marvelled. </P> <P> 'Bind my eyes&mdash;let me feel once with my fingers, and even then I will leave thee opened-eyed behind,' he challenged. </P> <P> Kim stamped with vexation when the lad made his boast good. </P> <P> 'If it were men&mdash;or horses,' he said, 'I could do better. This playing with tweezers and knives and scissors is too little.' </P> <P> 'Learn first&mdash;teach later,' said Lurgan Sahib. 'Is he thy master?' </P> <P> 'Truly. But how is it done?' </P> <P> 'By doing it many times over till it is done perfectly&mdash;for it is worth doing.' </P> <P> The Hindu boy, in highest feather, actually patted Kim on the back. </P> <P> 'Do not despair,' he said. 'I myself will teach thee.' </P> <P> 'And I will see that thou art well taught,' said Lurgan Sahib, still speaking in the vernacular, 'for except my boy here&mdash;it was foolish of him to buy so much white arsenic when, if he had asked, I could have given it&mdash;except my boy here I have not in a long time met with one better worth teaching. And there are ten days more ere thou canst return to Lucknao where they teach nothing&mdash;at the long price. We shall, I think, be friends.' </P> <P>
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