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Kim

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On the second day the road rose steeply to a grass spur above the forest; and it was here, about sunset, that they came across an aged lama&mdash;but they called him a bonze&mdash;sitting cross-legged above a mysterious chart held down by stones, which he was explaining to a young man, evidently a neophyte, of singular, though unwashen, beauty. The striped umbrella had been sighted half a march away, and Kim had suggested a halt till it came up to them. </P> <P> 'Ha!' said Hurree Babu, resourceful as Puss-in-Boots. 'That is eminent local holy man. Probably subject of my royal master.' </P> <P> 'What is he doing? It is very curious.' </P> <P> 'He is expounding holy picture&mdash;all hand-worked.' </P> <P> The two men stood bareheaded in the wash of the afternoon sunlight low across the gold-coloured grass. The sullen coolies, glad of the check, halted and slid down their loads. </P> <P> 'Look!' said the Frenchman. 'It is like a picture for the birth of a religion&mdash;the first teacher and the first disciple. Is he a Buddhist?' </P> <P> 'Of some debased kind,' the other answered. 'There are no true Buddhists among the Hills. But look at the folds of the drapery. Look at his eyes&mdash;how insolent! Why does this make one feel that we are so young a people?' The speaker struck passionately at a tall weed. 'We have nowhere left our mark yet. Nowhere! That, do you understand, is what disquiets me.' He scowled at the placid face, and the monumental calm of the pose. </P> <P> 'Have patience. We shall make your mark together&mdash;we and you young people. Meantime, draw his picture.' </P> <P> The Babu advanced loftily; his back out of all keeping with his deferential speech, or his wink towards Kim. </P> <P> 'Holy One, these be Sahibs. My medicines cured one of a flux, and I go into Simla to oversee his recovery. They wish to see thy picture&mdash;' </P> <P> 'To heal the sick is always good. This is the Wheel of Life,' said the lama, 'the same I showed thee in the hut at Ziglaur when the rain fell.' </P> <P> 'And to hear thee expound it.' </P> <P> The lama's eyes lighted at the prospect of new listeners. 'To expound the Most Excellent Way is good. Have they any knowledge of Hindi, such as had the Keeper of Images?' </P> <P> 'A little, maybe.' </P> <P> Hereat, simply as a child engrossed with a new game, the lama threw back his head and began the full-throated invocation of the Doctor of Divinity ere he opens the full doctrine. The strangers leaned on their alpenstocks and listened. Kim, squatting humbly, watched the red sunlight on their faces, and the blend and parting of their long shadows. They wore un-English leggings and curious girt-in belts that reminded him hazily of the pictures in a book in St Xavier's library "The Adventures of a Young Naturalist in Mexico" was its name. Yes, they looked very like the wonderful M. Sumichrast of that tale, and very unlike the 'highly unscrupulous folk' of Hurree Babu's imagining. The coolies, earth-coloured and mute, crouched reverently some twenty or thirty yards away, and the Babu, the slack of his thin gear snapping like a marking-flag in the chill breeze, stood by with an air of happy proprietorship. </P> <P> 'These are the men,' Hurree whispered, as the ritual went on and the two whites followed the grass-blade sweeping from Hell to Heaven and back again. 'All their books are in the large kilta with the reddish top&mdash;books and reports and maps&mdash;and I have seen a King's letter that either Hilas or Bunar has written. They guard it most carefully. They have sent nothing back from Hilas or Leh. That is sure.' </P> <P> 'Who is with them?' </P> <P> 'Only the beegar-coolies. They have no servants. They are so close they cook their own food.' </P> <P> 'But what am I to do?' </P> <P> 'Wait and see. Only if any chance comes to me thou wilt know where to seek for the papers.' </P> <P> 'This were better in Mahbub Ali's hands than a Bengali's,' said Kim scornfully. </P> <P> 'There are more ways of getting to a sweetheart than butting down a wall.' </P> <P> 'See here the Hell appointed for avarice and greed. Flanked upon the one side by Desire and on the other by Weariness.' The lama warmed to his work, and one of the strangers sketched him in the quick-fading light. </P> <P> 'That is enough,' the man said at last brusquely. 'I cannot understand him, but I want that picture. He is a better artist than I. Ask him if he will sell it.' </P> <P> 'He says "No, sar,"' the Babu replied. The lama, of course, would no more have parted with his chart to a casual wayfarer than an archbishop would pawn the holy vessels of his cathedral. All Tibet is full of cheap reproductions of the Wheel; but the lama was an artist, as well as a wealthy Abbot in his own place. </P> <P> 'Perhaps in three days, or four, or ten, if I perceive that the Sahib is a Seeker and of good understanding, I may myself draw him another. But this was used for the initiation of a novice. Tell him so, hakim.' </P> <P> 'He wishes it now&mdash;for money.' </P> <P> The lama shook his head slowly and began to fold up the Wheel. The Russian, on his side, saw no more than an unclean old man haggling over a dirty piece of paper. He drew out a handful of rupees, and snatched half-jestingly at the chart, which tore in the lama's grip. A low murmur of horror went up from the coolies&mdash;some of whom were Spiti men and, by their lights, good Buddhists. The lama rose at the insult; his hand went to the heavy iron pencase that is the priest's weapon, and the Babu danced in agony. </P> <P> 'Now you see&mdash;you see why I wanted witnesses. They are highly unscrupulous people. Oh, sar! sar! You must not hit holyman!' </P> <P> 'Chela! He has defiled the Written Word!' </P> <P> It was too late. Before Kim could ward him off, the Russian struck the old man full on the face. Next instant he was rolling over and over downhill with Kim at his throat. The blow had waked every unknown Irish devil in the boy's blood, and the sudden fall of his enemy did the rest. The lama dropped to his knees, half-stunned; the coolies under their loads fled up the hill as fast as plainsmen run aross the level. They had seen sacrilege unspeakable, and it behoved them to get away before the Gods and devils of the hills took vengeance. The Frenchman ran towards the lama, fumbling at his revolver with some notion of making him a hostage for his companion. A shower of cutting stones&mdash;hillmen are very straight shots&mdash;drove him away, and a coolie from Ao-chung snatched the lama into the stampede. All came about as swiftly as the sudden mountain-darkness. </P> <P> 'They have taken the baggage and all the guns,' yelled the Frenchman, firing blindly into the twilight. </P> <P> 'All right, sar! All right! Don't shoot. I go to rescue,' and Hurree, pounding down the slope, cast himself bodily upon the delighted and astonished Kim, who was banging his breathless foe's head against a boulder. </P> <P> 'Go back to the coolies,' whispered the Babu in his ear. 'They have the baggage. The papers are in the kilta with the red top, but look through all. Take their papers, and specially the murasla [King's letter]. Go! The other man comes!' </P> <P> Kim tore uphill. A revolver-bullet rang on a rock by his side, and he cowered partridge-wise. </P> <P> 'If you shoot,' shouted Hurree, 'they will descend and annihilate us. I have rescued the gentleman, sar. This is particularly dangerous.' </P> <P> 'By Jove!' Kim was thinking hard in English. 'This is dam'-tight place, but I think it is self-defence.' He felt in his bosom for Mahbub's gift, and uncertainly&mdash;save for a few practice shots in the Bikanir desert, he had never used the little gun&mdash;pulled the trigger. </P> <P> 'What did I say, sar!' The Babu seemed to be in tears. 'Come down here and assist to resuscitate. We are all up a tree, I tell you.' </P> <P> The shots ceased. There was a sound of stumbling feet, and Kim hurried upward through the gloom, swearing like a cat&mdash;or a country-bred. </P> <P> 'Did they wound thee, chela?' called the lama above him. </P> <P> 'No. And thou?' He dived into a clump of stunted firs. </P> <P> 'Unhurt. Come away. We go with these folk to Shamlegh-under-the-Snow.' </P> <P> 'But not before we have done justice,' a voice cried. 'I have got the Sahibs' guns&mdash;all four. Let us go down.' </P> <P> 'He struck the Holy One&mdash;we saw it! Our cattle will be barren&mdash;our wives will cease to bear! The snows will slide upon us as we go home... Atop of all other oppression too!' </P> <P> The little fir-clump filled with clamouring coolies&mdash;panic-stricken, and in their terror capable of anything. The man from Ao-chung clicked the breech-bolt of his gun impatiently, and made as to go downhill. </P> <P> 'Wait a little, Holy One; they cannot go far. Wait till I return,' said he. </P> <P> 'It is this person who has suffered wrong,' said the lama, his hand over his brow. </P> <P> 'For that very reason,' was the reply. </P> <P> 'If this person overlooks it, your hands are clean. Moreover, ye acquire merit by obedience.' </P> <P> 'Wait, and we will all go to Shamlegh together,' the man insisted. </P> <P> For a moment, for just so long as it needs to stuff a cartridge into a breech-loader, the lama hesitated. Then he rose to his feet, and laid a finger on the man's shoulder. </P> <P> 'Hast thou heard? I say there shall be no killing&mdash;I who was Abbot of Such-zen. Is it any lust of thine to be re-born as a rat, or a snake under the eaves&mdash;a worm in the belly of the most mean beast? Is it thy wish to&mdash;' </P> <P> The man from Ao-chung fell to his knees, for the voice boomed like a Tibetan devil-gong. </P> <P> 'Ai! ai!' cried the Spiti men. 'Do not curse us&mdash;do not curse him. It was but his zeal, Holy One! ... Put down the rifle, fool!' </P> <P> 'Anger on anger! Evil on evil! There will be no killing. Let the priest-beaters go in bondage to their own acts. Just and sure is the Wheel, swerving not a hair! They will be born many times&mdash;in torment.' His head drooped, and he leaned heavily on Kim's shoulder. </P> <P> 'I have come near to great evil, chela,' he whispered in that dead hush under the pines. 'I was tempted to loose the bullet; and truly, in Tibet there would have been a heavy and a slow death for them ... He struck me across the face ... upon the flesh ...' He slid to the ground, breathing heavily, and Kim could hear the over-driven heart bump and check. </P> <P> 'Have they hurt him to the death?' said the Ao-chung man, while the others stood mute. </P> <P> Kim knelt over the body in deadly fear. 'Nay,' he cried passionately, 'this is only a weakness.' Then he remembered that he was a white man, with a white man's camp-fittings at his service. 'Open the kiltas! The Sahibs may have a medicine.' </P> <P> 'Oho! Then I know it,' said the Ao-chung man with a laugh. 'Not for five years was I Yankling Sahib's shikarri without knowing that medicine. I too have tasted it. Behold!' </P> <P> He drew from his breast a bottle of cheap whisky&mdash;such as is sold to explorers at Leh&mdash;and cleverly forced a little between the lama's teeth. </P> <P> 'So I did when Yankling Sahib twisted his foot beyond Astor. Aha! I have already looked into their baskets&mdash;but we will make fair division at Shamlegh. Give him a little more. It is good medicine. Feel! His heart goes better now. Lay his head down and rub a little on the chest. If he had waited quietly while I accounted for the Sahibs this would never have come. But perhaps the Sahibs may chase us here. Then it would not be wrong to shoot them with their own guns, heh?' </P> <P> 'One is paid, I think, already,' said Kim between his teeth. 'I kicked him in the groin as we went downhill. Would I had killed him!' </P> <P> 'It is well to be brave when one does not live in Rampur,' said one whose hut lay within a few miles of the Rajah's rickety palace. 'If we get a bad name among the Sahibs, none will employ us as shikarris any more.' </P> <P> 'Oh, but these are not Angrezi Sahibs&mdash;not merry-minded men like Fostum Sahib or Yankling Sahib. They are foreigners&mdash;they cannot speak Angrezi as do Sahibs.' </P> <P> Here the lama coughed and sat up, groping for the rosary. </P> <P> 'There shall be no killing,' he murmured. 'Just is the Wheel! Evil on evil&mdash;' </P> <P> 'Nay, Holy One. We are all here.' The Ao-chung man timidly patted his feet. 'Except by thy order, no one shall be slain. Rest awhile. We will make a little camp here, and later, as the moon rises, we go to Shamlegh-under-the-Snow.' </P> <P> 'After a blow,' said a Spiti man sententiously, 'it is best to sleep.' </P> <P> 'There is, as it were, a dizziness at the back of my neck, and a pinching in it. Let me lay my head on thy lap, chela. I am an old man, but not free from passion ... We must think of the Cause of Things.' </P> <P> 'Give him a blanket. We dare not light a fire lest the Sahibs see.' </P> <P> 'Better get away to Shamlegh. None will follow us to Shamlegh.' </P> <P> This was the nervous Rampur man. </P> <P> 'I have been Fostum Sahib's shikarri, and I am Yankling Sahib's shikarri. I should have been with Yankling Sahib now but for this cursed beegar [the corvee]. Let two men watch below with the guns lest the Sahibs do more foolishness. I shall not leave this Holy One.' </P> <P> They sat down a little apart from the lama, and, after listening awhile, passed round a water-pipe whose receiver was an old Day and Martin blacking-bottle. The glow of the red charcoal as it went from hand to hand lit up the narrow, blinking eyes, the high Chinese cheek-bones, and the bull-throats that melted away into the dark duffle folds round the shoulders. They looked like kobolds from some magic mine&mdash;gnomes of the hills in conclave. And while they talked, the voices of the snow-waters round them diminished one by one as the night-frost choked and clogged the runnels. </P> <P> 'How he stood up against us!' said a Spiti man admiring. 'I remember an old ibex, out Ladakh-way, that Dupont Sahib missed on a shoulder-shot, seven seasons back, standing up just like him. Dupont Sahib was a good shikarri.' </P> <P> 'Not as good as Yankling Sahib.' The Ao-chung man took a pull at the whisky-bottle and passed it over. 'Now hear me&mdash;unless any other man thinks he knows more.' </P> <P> The challenge was not taken up. </P> <P> 'We go to Shamlegh when the moon rises. There we will fairly divide the baggage between us. I am content with this new little rifle and all its cartridges.' </P> <P> 'Are the bears only bad on thy holding? said a mate, sucking at the pipe. </P> <P> 'No; but musk-pods are worth six rupees apiece now, and thy women can have the canvas of the tents and some of the cooking-gear. We will do all that at Shamlegh before dawn. Then we all go our ways, remembering that we have never seen or taken service with these Sahibs, who may, indeed, say that we have stolen their baggage.' </P> <P> 'That is well for thee, but what will our Rajah say?' </P> <P> 'Who is to tell him? Those Sahibs, who cannot speak our talk, or the Babu, who for his own ends gave us money? Will he lead an army against us? What evidence will remain? That we do not need we shall throw on Shamlegh-midden, where no man has yet set foot.' </P> <P> 'Who is at Shamlegh this summer?' The place was only a grazing centre of three or four huts.' </P> <P> 'The Woman of Shamlegh. She has no love for Sahibs, as we know. The others can be pleased with little presents; and here is enough for us all.' He patted the fat sides of the nearest basket. </P> <P> 'But&mdash;but&mdash;' </P> <P> 'I have said they are not true Sahibs. All their skins and heads were bought in the bazar at Leh. I know the marks. I showed them to ye last march.' </P> <P> 'True. They were all bought skins and heads. Some had even the moth in them.' </P> <P> That was a shrewd argument, and the Ao-chung man knew his fellows. </P> <P> 'If the worst comes to the worst, I shall tell Yankling Sahib, who is a man of a merry mind, and he will laugh. We are not doing any wrong to any Sahibs whom we know. They are priest-beaters. They frightened us. We fled! Who knows where we dropped the baggage? Do ye think Yankling Sahib will permit down-country police to wander all over the hills, disturbing his game? It is a far cry from Simla to Chini, and farther from Shamlegh to Shamlegh-midden.' </P> <P> 'So be it, but I carry the big kilta. The basket with the red top that the Sahibs pack themselves every morning.' </P> <P> 'Thus it is proved,' said the Shamlegh man adroitly, 'that they are Sahibs of no account. Who ever heard of Fostum Sahib, or Yankling Sahib, or even the little Peel Sahib that sits up of nights to shoot serow&mdash;I say, who, ever heard of these Sahibs coming into the hills without a down-country cook, and a bearer, and&mdash;and all manner of well-paid, high-handed and oppressive folk in their tail? How can they make trouble? What of the kilta?' </P> <P> 'Nothing, but that it is full of the Written Word&mdash;books and papers in which they wrote, and strange instruments, as of worship.' </P> <P> 'Shamlegh-midden will take them all.' </P> <P> 'True! But how if we insult the Sahibs' Gods thereby! I do not like to handle the Written Word in that fashion. And their brass idols are beyond my comprehension. It is no plunder for simple hill-folk.' </P> <P> 'The old man still sleeps. Hst! We will ask his chela.' The Ao-chung man refreshed himself, and swelled with pride of leadership. </P> <P> 'We have here,' he whispered, 'a kilta whose nature we do not know.' </P> <P> 'But I do,' said Kim cautiously. The lama drew breath in natural, easy sleep, and Kim had been thinking of Hurree's last words. As a player of the Great Game, he was disposed just then to reverence the Babu. 'It is a kilta with a red top full of very wonderful things, not to be handled by fools.' </P> <P> 'I said it; I said it,' cried the bearer of that burden. 'Thinkest thou it will betray us?' </P> <P> 'Not if it be given to me. I can draw out its magic. Otherwise it will do great harm.' </P> <P> 'A priest always takes his share.' Whisky was demoralizing the Ao-chung man. </P> <P> 'It is no matter to me.' Kim answered, with the craft of his mother-country. 'Share it among you, and see what comes!' </P> <P> 'Not I. I was only jesting. Give the order. There is more than enough for us all. We go our way from Shamlegh in the dawn.' </P> <P> They arranged and re-arranged their artless little plans for another hour, while Kim shivered with cold and pride. The humour of the situation tickled the Irish and the Oriental in his soul. Here were the emissaries of the dread Power of the North, very possibly as great in their own land as Mahbub or Colonel Creighton, suddenly smitten helpless. One of them, he privately knew, would be lame for a time. They had made promises to Kings. Tonight they lay out somewhere below him, chartless, foodless, tentless, gunless&mdash;except for Hurree Babu, guideless. And this collapse of their Great Game (Kim wondered to whom they would report it), this panicky bolt into the night, had come about through no craft of Hurree's or contrivance of Kim's, but simply, beautifully, and inevitably as the capture of Mahbub's fakir-friends by the zealous young policeman at Umballa. </P> <P> 'They are there&mdash;with nothing; and, by Jove, it is cold! I am here with all their things. Oh, they will be angry! I am sorry for Hurree Babu.' </P> <P> Kim might have saved his pity, for though at that moment the Bengali suffered acutely in the flesh, his soul was puffed and lofty. A mile down the hill, on the edge of the pine-forest, two half-frozen men&mdash;one powerfully sick at intervals&mdash;were varying mutual recriminations with the most poignant abuse of the Babu, who seemed distraught with terror. They demanded a plan of action. He explained that they were very lucky to be alive; that their coolies, if not then stalking them, had passed beyond recall; that the Rajah, his master, was ninety miles away, and, so far from lending them money and a retinue for the Simla journey, would surely cast them into prison if he heard that they had hit a priest. He enlarged on this sin and its consequences till they bade him change the subject. Their one hope, said he, was unostentatious flight from village to village till they reached civilization; and, for the hundredth time dissolved in tears, he demanded of the high stars why the Sahibs 'had beaten holy man'. </P> <P> Ten steps would have taken Hurree into the creaking gloom utterly beyond their reach&mdash;to the shelter and food of the nearest village, where glib-tongued doctors were scarce. But he preferred to endure cold, belly-pinch, bad words, and occasional blows in the company of his honoured employers. Crouched against a tree-trunk, he sniffed dolefully. </P> <P> 'And have you thought,' said the uninjured man hotly, 'what sort of spectacle we shall present wandering through these hills among these aborigines?' </P> <P> Hurree Babu had thought of little else for some hours, but the remark was not to his address. </P> <P> 'We cannot wander! I can hardly walk,' groaned Kim's victim. </P> <P> 'Perhaps the holy man will be merciful in loving-kindness, sar, otherwise&mdash;' </P> <P> 'I promise myself a peculiar pleasure in emptying my revolver into that young bonze when next we meet,' was the unchristian answer. </P> <P> 'Revolvers! Vengeance! Bonzes!' Hurree crouched lower. The war was breaking out afresh. 'Have you no consideration for our loss? The baggage! The baggage!' He could hear the speaker literally dancing on the grass. 'Everything we bore! Everything we have secured! Our gains! Eight months' work! Do you know what that means? "Decidedly it is we who can deal with Orientals!" Oh, you have done well.' </P> <P> They fell to it in several tongues, and Hurree smiled. Kim was with the kiltas, and in the kiltas lay eight months of good diplomacy. There was no means of communicating with the boy, but he could be trusted. For the rest, Hurree could so stage-manage the journey through the hills that Hilas, Bunar, and four hundred miles of hill-roads should tell the tale for a generation. Men who cannot control their own coolies are little respected in the Hills, and the hillman has a very keen sense of humour. </P> <P> 'If I had done it myself,' thought Hurree, 'it would not have been better; and, by Jove, now I think of it, of course I arranged it myself. How quick I have been! Just when I ran downhill I thought it! Thee outrage was accidental, but onlee me could have worked it&mdash;ah&mdash;for all it was dam'-well worth. Consider the moral effect upon these ignorant peoples! No treaties&mdash;no papers&mdash;no written documents at all&mdash;and me to interpret for them. How I shall laugh with the Colonel! I wish I had their papers also: but you cannot occupy two places in space simultaneously. Thatt is axiomatic.' </P> <BR><BR><BR>
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